WEEKLY PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS

Dave Boon, member of the Fort Collins Rotary After Work club, and Past President of the Rocky Mountain Youth Leadership Board of Directors, will be with us on August 15th to bring the club up to date on the RYLA program.  After an introduction by Lloyd Thomas, Dave will highlight the current outreach  of Rocky Mountain Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RM-RYLA).  This program is unique in the RI world and is a collaborative partnership between Rotary Districts 5450 and 5440.

RMRYLA delivers five, week-long leadership programs each year for up to 720 youth: 

  • two summer leadership programs for the traditional RYLA (11th and 12th graders)
  • two summer programs for students between their 7th and 8th grades (Young RYLA)
  • one program (RYLA+) for students with severe physical handicaps.

 With a budget of $300,000 annually, RM-RYLA and its five youth leadership programs makes a positive impact and changes the lives of teenagers throughout Rotary Districts 5440 and 5450,.  Rotary Clubs financially support the program and select candidates to attend from their local communities.  RM-RYLA is a leader in the RI World!

Dave is dedicated to helping teens and young adults lead healthy and productive lives.  In the pursuit of this purpose, he has coached, taught high school and community college classes, and served as a university professor.  He and his wife, June, have  raised two daughters, and mentored dozens of young people.

President Steve Laine announced the establishment of two new scholarships, funded by Ada Chen.  The scholarships, named in honor of Ada's late husband, Dr. Young Hai Chen, will provide yearly $3000 scholarships to CSU and $2000 scholarships to Front Range Community College.  Both scholarships are funded for 5 years by a generous gift of $30,000 from Ada.  Ada told an emotional story of coming to the USA and CSU, the many blessings she has received since, and recounted how much Young Hai loved Rotary.  Ada received a standing ovation for her comments.  Thanks for your leadership and caring, Ada.  
Bill Timpson introduced Lindsay Pointer, who has been studying Restorative Justice in New Zealand on a Rotary Peace Fellowship.  
Last week we were treated to the soothing and familiar radio voice of Neil Best, President and CEO of Community Radio for Northern Colorado, when he presented a topic on everyone's mind, "Fake News" and it's history in the US.  Perhaps there is comfort when we consider the problem is not new.  George Washington told Alexander Hamilton in 1796 he was leaving office primarily because of the effects of a hostile press. In the 18th century it was clear that reporting in the NY Sun was designed for the sole purpose of increasing circulation.  In the early 19th century the terms "yellow journalism" and subsequently "tabloid journalism" were needed to describe the current journalistic content.  Totally fabricated stories persist: fast forward to gunshots fired because of "the child slavery ring run by Hillary Clinton and associates out of a pizza shop", and we were reminded such misinformation can have "real world" consequences.
 
Locally, the fight for subscribers and survival lead to "yellow journalism" in the 1920's when the Denver Post and Rocky Mountain News fought for reader share.  Next, Neil highlighted the importance of the economics of the news business and it's influence on what we hear and read.  Staff have been cut at most news outlets as the internet supplies information at lightning speed. News organizations debate whether readers are "citizens" or "consumers".  A pivotal change in our view of the validity of federal government supplied information took place during the Vietnam War and the Nixon administration.  Journalists could no longer take such information at face value and became more investigative.
 
We were given some tools to use to search through the "information" for the "knowledge". For example, we can check to see if the material has been edited. We can look for the "center" when we see extremes in reporting (think Fox vs MSNBC).  It behooves us all to do the work to find the facts and teach our children and grandchildren to navigate the morass of information that bombards us daily from so many sources.  Finally, in his only political comment, Neal stated "we (journalists) are not the enemies of the people".  The "newsroom" is most often staffed by dedicated honest people; some are giving their lives in this cause.
During the Centennial Celebration August 1, new members Susan Brand and Allan Kirkpatrick were inducted.  Susan was a Nursing Manager, Fresenius Kidney Care, and is the spouse of Rotarian Harry Mueller.  They met while both were living in Saudi Arabia.  Allan is a returning member of RCFC, and CSU  Professor of Mechanical Engineering.    
On our 100th anniversary, RCFC celebrated 100 years of Service Above Self by welcoming over 200 guests to the Stadium Club at CSU.  Centennial co-chairs Lynne Baker, John Roberts and Jan Bertholf, President Steve Laine, Past President Jeanne Fangman, Mayor Wade Troxell,
CSURF President Kathleen Henry District Governor Chuck Rutenberg, RI Zone 27 Director Larry Dimmitt, Legacy Fund Trustees chair Jud Harper and the Diamond Raffle team, Susan Harrison, Cindy DeGroot, Carrie Baumgart and Bonnie Titley all contributed to make it a memorable evening. 
Special thanks to Horse and Dragon Brewery, CEO Tim Cochran and Jewelry Emporium owner Susan Harrison, as well as every member who contributed to the Celebration and the Legacy Fund for making this all possible.  
Rob Marschke and Sally Lee presented a Community Grant to Teaching Tree at the Early Childhood Learning Center.  The $1350 will fund the education of 200 children a year in the curriculum that develops social and emotional skills in preparation for kindergarten.

On July 25th, Tim Cochran, co-owner of Horse & Dragon Brewing Company, presented an overview of the craft beer industry in the United States and Colorado as well as a brief history of his company. 

 
In 2013, there were some 2700 craft breweries in the United States; in 2013, craft beer made up some 6% of the beer market; by 2017, there were some 6500 craft breweries making up some 13% of the beer market.  Currently there are some 350 craft breweries in Colorado and the Craft Brewers Association is headquartered in Boulder.  Craft brewers are small and independent (if a brewer is more than 25% owned by a non-craft brewery, it is not craft), producing less than 6 million barrels per year.  Craft brewers have business models ranging from part-time through on-site sales (typically associated with a restaurant) to more-or-less wide distribution. 
 

Tim and his wife, after a number of years working for the Miller Brewing Co. at locations worldwide, moved to Fort Collins and founded Horse and Dragon in 2013.  After a year of getting the company up and running, they produced 418 barrels in 2014, with volumes increasing every year since.  Their main emphasis is on distribution to local establishments/restaurants for over-the-counter sales.  The pillars of their company are:  produce great and interesting beers; run an ethical operation, treating people well; minimize their environmental impact; and be pro-active members of the community.

Wednesday, July 18th, began the official kickoff for your Rotary Club’s centennial celebration with the dedication at the Café Grove at the Gardens on Spring Creek.  This event celebrated all four Rotary Clubs in Fort Collins along with the gratitude to Bob and Joyce Everitt for inspiring us to make this another great service project to the City of Fort Collins.   Bob and Joyce's daughter, Claudia Gillum joined, representing the Everitt family.  

The Gardens on Spring Creek is a spectacular community effort, and Rotary’s role will be a legacy for the next century.  Members of the four Rotary Clubs in Fort Collins have much to celebrate.  After all, this celebration has been 100 years in the making.

The raffle for a 1 carat diamond will be held August 1.  Don't miss out on your, and your friend's chance to win a diamond with an estimated worth of $14,000.  Just $25 per ticket, or 5 tickets for $100.  See Bonnie Titley for details.  
 
 

July 11, Committee Co-Chairs Rob Marschke and Kathy Nicol awarded two Community Grants. Accepting a $4000 grant for the Poudre Heritage Alliance were Kathleen Benedict, Executive Director and Bob Overbeck, Board Chairman.  The Poudre Heritage Alliance builds a deeper understanding of the Poudre River’s national significance including its role in shaping water development, water law, and water management.  Our $4,000.00 grant will support field trips to the Poudre River for ten Larimer County Schools, enabling 600 students to experience hands-on, inquiry-based learning.  The budget for our grant funding includes $2,500.00 for field trips, $1,000.00 for professional services, and $500.00 for program coordination. 

Accepting a $1150 grant for CSU's Camp Kesem were Sarah Whipple and Celia Adams.  Camp Kesem helps children living with a parent or guardian’s cancer by providing a free week of camp fun where they can interact with other children going through similar experiences and process their grief. Colorado State University students organize and participate in Camp Kesem.  Children experience a marked increase in ability to express their feelings, confidence in handling challenges, and improved self-esteem. 

At the end of the camp week a picnic is hosted for campers, their families, and the staff in Fort Collins.  Our $1,150.00 grant will fund a bus trip back to Fort Collins so that the children and their families can participate in the picnic.

 

Wednesday, July 11th, our speaker, a Ft Collins native is Melisa Esposito, now Director of Grants for Project C.U.R.E.  This organization is the world's largest distributor of donated medical supplies and equipment.  My experience in medicine reminds me there is an abundance of durable, usable items from our medical system because of Federal regulations requiring disposable and single use.  Multiple hospitals participate in this program including ones in Northern Colorado. Distribution is based on expert assessment of needs in locales. Specific donations were illustrated for a few of these projects-eg, OB delivery tables, hospital beds, water purification, and surgical supplies.  Rotary International currently provides grants for 6 projects in this organization.  Highlights with photos were shown for a few active projects. For example-

"Saving Mothers" partners with other NGO's and local governments to improve perinatal care in a number of countries (think AIDS) and has resulted in a 40% decrease in infant/maternal mortality where this has been in use.
A project in Tanzania addresses the needs of medical provision in prisons (often neglected in African countries)  with supplies for in-house dispensaries.
The needs (eg, 6 deliveries per day) of a large refugee camp in Rwanda seemed overwhelming where there are 3 medical doctors per 50,000 inhabitants. (Melisa listed the UN definitions for the terms "migrant", "asylum seeker" and "refugee"-terms all too familiar to us on the daily news reports).
Seemed to me, a David and Goliath story, in this world of seemingly overwhelming problems.  Organizations like this remind us that "David" can prevail.
HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY!!  No RCFC Meetings this week.  We'll see you all next Wednesday, July 11.  
 
"When in the course of human events it becomes necessary... We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."
RCFC Community Grants Co-Chairs Kathy Nicol and Rob Marschke presented a $3000 grant to Homeless Alliance (Homeless Gear Inc.), to assist the One Village One Family program supporting five families.  Accepting the award was Development Director Pam Brewer and Development Coordinator Fulvia Serra.  Homeless Gear's mission is to empower individuals and families who face homelessness to survive, move forward and thrive.

Loren W. Crabtree, recently the Chief Executive for Global Education for the Institute for Shipboard Education, summarized what the Semester at Sea is and does, and why it is headquartered at CSU.  The Institute is a 501c3 corporation that arranges two semester-long voyages each year for some 600 students each time.  Student participants earn 12 – 15 credits that are transferable, in addition to becoming better citizens of the world.  A small number of “life-long learners” can also participate on a credit or non-credit basis.  Courses concentrate on arts and sciences and Business subjects.  Each trip comprises some 104 days (one semester) at sea stopping at some ten ports for on-shore activities.  The average cost is $25,000.  Some 97% of past student participants have indicated that it was the best experience of their undergraduate careers.  Although many of the students are transformed by the experience, Dr. Crabtree suggests that the continuous up-close and personal involvement with the students might lead life-long learners who are “uptight” to focus on other experiences.   

Semester at Sea has been headquartered at CSU since 2014 because the school is highly competitive and internationalized (e.g., the Peace Corps originated here); within the framework of its land-grant origins, the school is well-respected in a significant number of related disciplines (in the top 82 in the country); the school has a wide base of entrepreneurial spirit; and some 80 CSU faculty and staff members have served on earlier Semester at Sea voyages.  CSU, with its wide-ranging international focus, was excited by the opportunity to host this innovative approach to increasing global awareness on the part of the undergraduate community. 

June 20, we performed our annual change of leadership, when Past President Glenn Schmidt hosted a light roasting/toasting of outgoing President Jeanne Fangman, and we inducted the 2018-19 Board and Officers:  
•President - Steve Laine
•President Elect - Rob Marschke
•Past President - Jeanne Fangman
•Club Treasurer - Kelso Kelly
•Club Assistant Treasurer - Bonnie Titley
•Club-secretary - Rod Morrison
•Executive Secretary - Phyllis Abt
•Director: Cindy De Groot - 2019
•Director: Kathy Nicol - 2019
•Director: Steve Vessey - 2020
•Director: Jean Lamm - 2020
•Director: Annette Geiselman - 2021
•Director: Robin Steele - 2021
 
President Steve Laine graduated from UCLA in 1984, and is the owner of MKO Financial.  He joined Rotary in 2006, and has served on the membership committee, board of directors, participated  in the four-way program and co-chaired the RYLA and Young RYLA committee.  Steve is a graduate of Rotary Leadership Institute.
Steve and his wife Kristine have three children; Matthew, who just graduated from CSU, Katherine now attending CSU, and Olivia, a freshman at Fossil Ridge High School this fall.  Steve says he is looking forward to a great year for our Club as we continue to make a positive impact on our community and the world.
 
Past-President Jeanne Fangman joined the Rotary Club of Fort Collins in 1994 (sponsored by Julie Johnson-Hafner).  Her Rotary involvement includes being Treasurer of Rotary READ since 1999, Chair of the Care and Recognition Committee, the Membership Committee and on the Community Grants Committee.    She joined the Board of Directors in 2013-14, served as Club Secretary in 2014-15 and was recognized as Quiet Rotarian in May, 2013. 
Larry Salmen, member of the newly formed IT Committee, announced the addition of a Calendar function to the RCFC home page, and gave a demonstration of how to access, and how members can logon and update their own profile.  If anyone needs help with their logon or password, please contact Larry, or IT Committee members Chuck Ulfers or Stacy Plemmons.  All 2018-19 Committee Chairs will be given "Editor" status for the new calendar, and a brief training how to access and add new events.  
 
Wednesday June 13, Bonnie Titley awarded Paul Harris Fellows to close friends Janice Skinner and Richard Crandall.  These bring the total PHF's sponsored by Bonnie to 25 - Amazing.  Thanks Bonnie.  
The Paul Harris Fellow was established in 1957 to honor Rotary Founder Paul Harris, to express appreciation for anyone contributing $1000 or more to support the humanitarian and educational programs of the Rotary Foundation.  Those program include an array of programs that save and invigorate lives around the world and enhance international friendships and understanding.  Foundation programs provide educational opportunities, food, potable water, health care, immunizations and shelter for millions of people.  Rotarians may also designate a Paul Harris Fellow to another person whose life demonstrates a shared purpose with the objectives and mission of the Rotary Foundation to build world understanding and peace.   
June 6, TRF Chair Mike Sollenberger recognized Lee Jeffrey (+5) ,Harry Taylor (+4) and Jerry Smith (+1) for their continued contribution to the Rotary Foundation.  

Our June 13th speaker, RCFC Member Nate Lamkin, came to Fort Collins from Massachusetts, where he served as a senior management member for Care Dimensions, the largest non-profit hospice in that state.  He has been the President of Pathways Care since May of 2017.  He started with the history of hospice starting in medieval Europe, and the modern start in the UK in 1967.  The first US hospice was established in Connecticut in 1973. 

Today there are 4382 Medicare certified hospice facilities in the US.  Lamkin indicated the average length of stay is 71 days, with the median stay 24 days, indicating most hospice engagements are long, but at least half are very short - less than 24 days.  He went on to note what hospice is NOT: abandoning hope, either hastening or prolonging death, over medication, or only for those actively dying.  Nate noted that hospice's core focus is on quality of life until the end, focusing on comfort care and assisting the person spend their remaining days where they consider "home".  

June 1 and 2, Twenty volunteers, from the Satellite along with Noon members, Rotary After Works members and a few Kiwanis had a successful painting weekend, painting the Cheetah, Otters, and Dinos classrooms for The Family Center.  Since 1995, The Family Center/La Familia, a bilingual organization, has offered high quality early childhood education and family strengthening services.  Thanks to everyone that helped!
RYLA Alum Jai Ramchander was introduced by Committee Chair Lloyd Thomas.  Jai will be a junior at Fossil Ridge H.S., and is a member of the National Honor Society, the Math Honor Society and the Sexual Assault Resource Team, a PSD's initiative to "promote community dialog and information about sexual assault".  He is Goalie for the J.V. soccer team, plays saxophone in Recreational Jazz Band, mentors academically challenged kids at the Boys & Girls Club, and volunteers at the "Loveland Kids Pack" (a collaborative project with the Loveland Rotary Club and the Larimer Co. food bank.)  Thanks Jai!
President Jeanne Fangman exchanges banners with Rotarian Jean Pierre Dayan, of France, a guest of Betty Brown.  Jean Pierre was accompanied by his son Franck, who is a professor at CSU.
Last week, Professor (University of Colorado) and author Dr Patty Limerick shared her insights into the Bear Ears National Monument controversy which is now being debated through the US court system. The 1906 Antiquities Act gave  a US president the power to create national monuments, but it is not clear whether the law grants Presidents the power to reduce.  In 2016 President Barack Obama created this monument  but a year later Donald Trump has attempted to dramatically (85%) reduce the size of Bears Ear.   
Patty detailed for us the historical and cultural reasons why a simple "pro or con" stance on this issue is difficult. The historical perspective was described as "largely absent from the (current) public debate".  Does the transition of large tracts of land from public or Native Americans to private ownership, or from private ownership to Federal ownership represent progress?  How has our appreciation of the beauty of arid lands changed our value of such property (especially in the west)?  Is the (unchallenged) presidential power to create (or change) national monuments desirable or appropriate?  What is unique about this site?
In Utah (as well as other parts of this continent) we must consider the historical and cultural connection between land and Native American peoples and how it differed from the European settlers beliefs.  Especially unique to Utah is the LDS influence.  Brigham Young wrote of the importance of stewardship of the land.  Early on, the church distributed land before the Federal government took on this role.  The church practiced peaceful relationships with the Natives.  In spite of more recent conflicts, the LDS church historically has been supportive of the Federal Government.
So often the history behind a current conflict has been forgotten; Dr Limerick helped us remember the value of understanding history in one of many present day debates.
 
 
 
Meeting Information

Welcome to our Club!

Meetings: Wednesday Noon
Drake Center (Lunch)
802 West Drake Road
Fort Collins, CO  80526
United States
 
Club Executives & Directors
President
President Elect
Treasurer
Secretary
Board Member
Board Member
Board Member
Board Member
Board Member
Board Member
Board Member
Immediate Past President
 
Updates?
To get your announcement, any other news, or edits into the Rotogear or website please email complete information to editor.rcfc@gmail.com.
Thank You! 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
RotoGear
August 15, 2018
Aug 11, 2018
August 8, 2018
Aug 06, 2018
August 1, 2018
Jul 30, 2018
July 25, 2018
Jul 22, 2018
July 25, 2018
Jul 17, 2018